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>> barack obama calls for compromise as the u.s. approaches the brink of another economic crisis. in a rare appearance on a u.s. talk show he appealed to congress to make a deal to avoid tipping the country into recession. you're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up, 21 policemen are buried in pakistan after being kidnap and shot by the taliban. anger and grief in india. candlelit vigils continue as the 22-year-old gang rape victim is cremated. plus moments of impact -- amateur video captures a russian plane after it overshoots a runway and crashes into a motorway. hello, president obama has made another appeal to the u.s. congress to reach an agreement in the next 48 hours to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. it's a term used to describe the expiry of tax cuts dating back to 2001. if there is no deal, 88% of americans will end up paying $400 billion more in 2014. that will be coupled with more than a trillion dollars in automatic government spending cuts. according to the congressional budget office it will start with $200 billion in military and social welfare c
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
is fragile at best. >> the u.s. is about 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of the fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth, it is going to have repercussions around the world. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worried about this? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. to have that large player virtually shut in a recession would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not think that's at the moment. we do not want to have this effect on a french our recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill and to the white house? >> i would say focus on the real issues. the real issues are the united states and its leadership role in the world. the u.s. has an economic leadership in the world. to protect that and make sure that that leadership in tourist, the uncertainty has to be removed. if you are speaking from
talks on the u.s. budget crisis. >> the annual chaos computer club conference gets under way in hamburg with organizers warning that government internet surveillance is a growing threat. the international convoy for syria made a proposal in damascus where he is delivering talks. >> he will also be holding discussions in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basis of the peace plan that was agreed upon in june. >> the geneva agreement calls for a cease-fire and the
businesses major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> can u.s. politicians reached a deal to stop tax rises in spending cuts from damaging the american and the global economy? hillary clinton is being treated at this hospital in new york. she has a blood clot. there's concern over the health of the venezuelan president who has suffered complications after cancer surgery in cuba. walk into bbc world news. coming up, and look back at the british troops as they prepared handover to afghan forces. new zealand becomes the first major city to welcome 2013. time is running out for politicians in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wa
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
at the united states. after the launch that happened during the newscast last evening. u.s. officials say there will be consequences. they report this is video of watching the launch at command center. the three-stage rocket is similar to one to carry warhead to california. but the north is long way from pulling off the nuclear attac attack. this rocket carried weather satellite but the launch itself violates all kind of united nations resolution. >> the international community has to continue to make clear that there won't be any benefit for north korea in this. and on the contrary, that there will be consequences. >> shepard: no word on what the consequences might be as usual. by the way, analysts say north korea spent more than $1 billion on the last two rocket launchs. enough to feed the country for a year. that country is very hungry. jennifer griffin at the pentagon tonight. where was this headed? >> reporter: well, remember, the pentagon was tracking this with egypt radar. the u.s. navy moved several warships in to the pacific. with that radar on board. they were watching. waiting
has warned u.s. lawmakers, they have a duty to solve. we sat down with her here in washington. >> christine lagarde, the fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in
to new york and take a look at housing figures in the u.s. it looks like the real estate sector may be moving on up. here in london, will be picture be so optimistic? mortgage and retail figures out later this morning should give us an indication. >>> plus, in a global exclusive, cnbc's geoff cutmore speaks with alex ushmanov on his return on facebook, and his outlook for the xwloeshl economy. >>> welcome back to the program. it's been a busy year. after 12 months of uneven growth, the prospects for 2013 look equally uncertain. billionaire investor and russia's wealthiest man alisher usmanov told cnbc's geoff cutmore that rebalance of growth is need. >> 2013 will be a year where we need to search for solutions. there is a big discussion going on about the state of the global economy. everyone is involved in that debate, in that discussion about wa to do. governments, central banks, economists, businessmen, scholars. so as far as i'm concerned, what really worried me and what i think is the real cause of the uncertainty is the enormous disparity that exists between the various moneta
him. he has had a series of health problems in recent years. a shake-up at the u.s. state department. who is out of a job following the findings of a security investigation. women using technology to build their business. the those headlines in just a moment. >> it is a very unsettled picture across europe. we have this area of low pressure. this frontal system giving some torrential rainfall. and improvement here but on the forward edge of this frontal system there is likely to be some snow extending down toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the monsoon rains are pushing further, a decent amount of rain is being reported but generally you see the rainfall pushing away from the democratic republic of the," . -- of congo. >> the french president, presid
. the longer this goes on, the bigger that challenge is. >> is your warning for u.s. action or action in conjunction? >> the secretary is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the state department are meeting with our alies. the potential for recognition of the new syrian national council is something we would be doing, a step our alies have taken. i commend ambassador ford for their leadership on the plementic side to deal with this grinding, painful, two-year-long conflict. the differences are far less important than the commonality, which the president has made a clear declaration, which we will back. thank you. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> you are going to hear from senator leiberman at the foundation for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will b
with politics and public affairs, we casey jennings live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watched key public policy defense. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs, get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should n
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
of the key city aleppo. some rebels named by the u.s. state department terrorists. they designated a terrorist group linked to al qaeda in iraq. the department imposed sanctions. what does it mean to sort out good rebels from bad? nick paton walsh explains. >> reporter: not only look different, black flags, well armed and disciplined, they fight differently, too. using suicide tactics and mass casualty car bombs, radical extremists but undeniably effective. behind a stream of rebel victories, overrunning regime bases across syria, many thinking the end of assad is nearer than ever. why has the united states, who also want assad gone, black listed them as terrorists? >> we've had concerns that al nusra is little more than a front for al qaeda in iraq who has moved some of its operations into syria. >> reporter: that link clear in the document filed monday, al nusra deemed not a new group, another name for al qaeda in iraq. u.s. officials believing insurgents who kill americans in iraq fighting for rebels against assad. this move may make sense in principle but, say experts now, less
for the organized labor movement in the u.s., passage for this law in michigan would be a body blow to the labor movement in the u.s., wolf. >> certainly would be. thanks very much for that, jessica. >>> the president's due back here in washington just in a little while from michigan. his focus will be back on trying to get a deal with the house speaker john boehner over taxes and spending cuts. our chief political analyst gloria borger is here to take a closer look at the agreements, the disagreements, i guess there's more disagreements than agreements. let's step back and see where these two sides stand, gloria. >> let's step back from the cliff here for a minute, wolf. and you'll see that on tax, which is of course the crux of this matter, there's a huge difference between congressional republicans who want to raise $800 billion over ten years from tax increases. and of course the white house that wants to, you know, basically double that. i mean, the white house says, we need to get more revenue from taxes. if you break apart these tax number, take a look, because of course we know, the big
for his alleged role in the attack that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. molly is live in washington with the latest. hi, molly. >> hi, rick. he is a leader in the terror world. he is ambitious and very dangerous and now egyptian authorities aided by u.s. intelligence have him. officials have been tracking him for months according to the "wall street journal" and interest intensified after followers participated in the attack in benghazi, libya. he was captured in the past week or so, but we don't have details yet on how he was detained. u.s.ish ifs have not been able to interrogate him yet. here is what we know. ahmad is a former egyptian jihad member. he was released from a prison in march of 2011. he is the leader of the jamal network and has been setting up terror training camps in libya and egypt with some financial help from al-qaeda and yemen. and he was trying to set up al-qaeda in egypt. meanwhile secretary of state hillary clinton will be testifying on the benghazi uhing tay. a review board investigating the attack should be completed soon and s
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
county. >> and a look back at some of the year's big stories in the u.s. of a. we'll be right back. ,,,, . >> there is the golden gate bridge, sunny and chilly. a few clouds around. aside from that, a nice day. ,,,,,,,, ban" bandwagon... as the new year begins tuesday. . >>> one of the bay area's largeet counties is jumping on the plastic bag ban bandwagon. as the new year begins on tuesday, the new ban applies to alameda county's unincorporated areas and the cities. the stores won't be able to give customers one-time use plastic bag. instead, bring your own bag or pay 10 cents for each recyclable paper bag. similar laws are in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. san jose said since the ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets has gone down 59%. >>> around here, we're seeing the sun shining finally. and -- . >> i am sure that is listed on paper. i am sure when they wrote that, it looked like a good idea. >> i butchered it twice now. >> plastic bag ban bandwagon. >> you got it. took a lot of practice. >> and
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
authority this that country, many are asking what this may mean in terms of u.s. involvement. but senior administration officials said there's still no plans to arm this group. yet the government hasn't ruled it out. the other issue on the forefront on the president's mind, the u.s. economy and that pending fiscal cliff. are we going to go over the fiscal cliff? >> you know, i remain optimistic that there are enough people of good will in this town that recognize our economy will be much better off, american families will be much better off if we get this done. the most important thing we can do is make sure middle class taxes don't go up on january 1. and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. >> prediction, are you going to be able to raise taxes, yes or no? >> taxes are going to go up one way or another. and i think the key is to make sure that taxes go up on the high end individuals like you and me, barbara. we can afford it. it is entirely possible for us to come up with a deal, but time
deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then we can fol
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
authorizing u.s. companies to the best of their pension funds, doing business with iran's energy sector. february of this year he offered a bipartisan resolution passed by unanimous vote of the senate for iran's right to freedom of assembly, speech and due process. day earlier iranians had taken to the street in peaceful demonstrations against the government or pressed by the siege of militia men. in times of peace and conflict he has traveled to the region to preserve the interests of our allies. in july he led a foundation to the middle east to discuss the ongoing threat posed by iran to review developments in the middle east peace process and traveled to saudi arabia, iraq, israel, lebanon, egypt, he met with u.s. troops in iraq and kuwait and iraq with vice president joe biden and general commander of u.s. troops, during the fighting in gaza. senator kc --casey has said we must prevent hamas, israel has the right to set up a naval blockade, key weapons to hamas and responsibility to protect its homeland. hamas is a terrorist organization that denies israel's right to exist and indis
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
and certain stories hit. this was the genesis for the book. i saw how the u.s. military particularly the air force defeated geography in the balkans. it turns out the army did well despite of, and the successful conclusion to the war in bosnia and kosovo were a factor in allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote to that. and what is really the success of the balkans and a panel and we were bloodied to bits in somalia that made people think we can do anything. and that's when geography got its revenge in the mountains and the desert sahara and afghanistan because the transformative moment for me i was embedded with the first battalion of the marine. en and coo eight in march of 2004 we were making an overland journey with several hundred miles to fallujah and it wasn't yet on the news, the battle of fallujah was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah and all we did this transport one marine battalion from one place to another, it wasn't particularly dangerous, but the statistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water models, tool kits,
. hammar told u.s. border officials in texas that he wanted to take with him his great grandfather's antique gun and those officials told hammar no problem. but when he got to mexico. border agents locked him unon violation charges of the country's strict gun laws and since then his parents and lawmakers have been working feverishly to get him out. on friday this marine who served us in iraq and afghanistan and also suffers from prost thattatic stress disorder was greed. he and his dad drove back from florida and hours ago after they arrived home in palmetto bay steve harrigan was live there and had a chance to talk to the dad. steve, how is the family doing tonight? >> jamie, we got to see john hammar pull up with his father after this long ordeal. they drove directly into the garage. john hammar is now suffering from some sort of stomach ailment he picked up inside that mexican prison. they actually had to make a stop on the drive home from the border at a louisiana hospital and john hammar's father says his son is so weak he can barely stand despite that, he says, this will be t
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. secretary of state hillary clinton has a just-added meeting today in dublin, ireland. here you see her earlier today. she and the russian minister decided to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
for the month of november in u.s. and canada. that is not good news for the retailer down $0.79. back to you. lori: nicole, always a pleasure could thank you. melissa: what is the hottest stock on wall street? could it be an analyst which mark on the firm of buying for bank analyst dick bove. lori: the dollar strengthening against the euro. predicting an even weaker euro zone. we are back after this. [ male announcer ] this is amy. amy likes to invest in the market. she also likes to ride her bike. she knows the potential for making or losing money can pop up anytime. that's why she trades with the leader in mobile trading. sshe's always ready to take action, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> 20 minutes past the hour, this is your fox new fox news b. defense secretary is saying u.s. intelligence services have very serious concerns about the routine use of chemical weapons in syria has the u.s. much official tells fox the syrian president is prepping a deadly nerve agent loading
of skilled workers coming from our country, u.s. schools, u.s. workforces. that is the skills contact at the country could easily get behind and support. that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. some of the issues i heard talked about before critical to that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the earliest ages to make sure that under-represented groups are taking to science? why do we have to drop off at middle school around young women? what are the long-term strategy is? we have to attack this on all cylinders and have and all of the above the strategy. but while we are doing the long- term strategy to have a bit of supply of stem and high skilled workers, we should not take our eye off what we can do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics that came out of the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we had if you just ensured that you had a higher graduation rate among those who declared a stem major in their freshman year.
the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the united states and our regional partners including armenia must be vigilant by fully comply current laws and regulations, and by a many sanctions is needed to close the loopholes. i hope that legislation is currently pending in the congress makes it way through rapidly and will do just that. regarding energy, sanctions are an essent
deserved it because it was a statement that now the u.s. is shifting back from the bush administration to obama. i think the same is true for the european union. >> your assessment has been pretty upbeat so far. i want to put this to you. at the top of the show, we said this is a day of celebration for the eu. no doubt about that. it also indicates it might be a day of celebration for the people of the eu, but i see no signs of those citizens cracky -- cracking open the champagne bottles today. >> it is unfortunate. we should see youngsters out there. we should see the you celebrating. i agree that it is unfortunate that we are not even able to celebrate what we have been living and experiencing for 60 years, which is prosperity and peace for everybody. i can berkeley understand that the current crisis destroys this -- i can understand that the current crisis destroys this. looking back, my family, many other families -- people had nothing to eat. they were freezing in the cold. just that should make it worth thinking back and open the bottles of champagne. >> thank you for those inter
inquiry to the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya has found security was grossly inadequate. >> the attack in september killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. the report has blamed systemic failures and leadership deficiencies at the state department. the secretary of state says she will adopt all of the recommendations. >> the inquiry also found that americans had no warning of the attack and little knowledge of the threat posed by local militia. >> funerals will be held today for six victims of the newtown school massacre, including the school principal. >> the incident has once again put the spotlight on gun control in america and the country's powerful gun lobby. the national rifle association has spoken out for the first time since the massacre. >> americans exercising their right to bear arms in the state of virginia, part of their constitutional guarantee to self-defense, but the deaths in connecticut have revived the debate about what kinds of weapons are needed for self- defense. many now want washington to come up with stricter laws about public acce
is affecting your trip home for the holidays. it will be a very merry christmas for the familiar leave this u.s. marine veteran just released from one of mexico's most dangerous prisons. where he stopped off before heading home causing some concern. how about this. a short-cut to becoming a doctor, a new program being offered by one of the most prestigious medical schools in our country saving both time and money for the students, but does it skimp on training, a doctor in three years? it's all happening now. but first there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poi
examples in the u.s. may be, i think we all it to the chinese reformers -- owe to the chinese reformers to familiarize them with other possibilities. prior to the financial crisis of 2008 and still to some degree today, many chinese reformers have focused chiefly on the u.s. to the exclusion of other models, drawn by our power as much as our ideals and ideas. i think it is more in power when to our chinese friends -- empowering to our chinese friends to lay out a broader array of possibilities. our chinese friends can see a range of possibilities and see what our universal ideals in promoting human dignity in a range of human institutional designed to get us there so they can craft something that is true to those ideals, but reflective of chinese society. just by way of example, six years ago, our harvard law school project worked with two chinese partner institutions and did the first conference ever in china's history on disability rights. we drew experts from an array of different countries, many of them individuals with disabilities. each of them discussed the models of his or her c
the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily political will, and i say that with regard to both political parties and the solution that has to be forthcoming in the weeks ahead and the months ahead will require the leaders to first of all put our nation fi
with former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton how and why these officials still have their jobs. gregg: just four days to the new year and potentially the fiscal cliff so far little to know progress reported in making a deal to avert across the board tax hikes for 90% of the american households. it's been 10 days since the president and the speaker held any substantial face-to-face meetings. is time up or is it still possible for both sides to reach a last minute deal? let's put the question to byron york of the "washington examiner". too late or, gosh, maybe this is so easy you can wait until the last minute? >> i guess it depends whether you believe in miracles, gregg. gregg: i don't. >> the only thing that is really happening is the days are ticking by. i think what we've got is, you go first situation here. remember, after the so-called plan b failed in the house, john boehner, speaker of the house said, look, it's up to the senate. we'll not do anything more. we already passed a bill a while back that would extend bush tax cuts for everybody. it is up to the senate to do something
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
. dr horton and jefferies are joining a chorus of u.s. companies hoping to save shareholders from the hefty taxes in 2013. accelerating the payment of all quarterly dividend that would have been paid next year. jefferies approved $0.7.05 a share to december 31. the videogame industry suffered another sales slump in november despite the release of high-profile installment in the call of duty and halo franchises. overall sales were down 11% from the same time last year. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer a questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legaplan attorney i
: we are going to talk about apple. they will bring some manufacturing home for the u.s. charles: about $100 million in 2013. we know that is a tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny amount of what they spent on fraction. i think this public opinion thing about bashing these companies that do not do certain manufacturing in america, it is somewhat misguiding. the same critics who are now saying we not stop back here were saying we were exporting the rest of the world. now, we are saying bring those jobs here. you cannot bring them back at the same wage. i do not think we have a responsibility to create a certain kind of job, but we have a responsibility to create jobs. if you want those chinese jobs, you can have them. dagen: steve jobs told president obama that those jobs were not coming back. charles: somehow the administration going after profit, you know, whatever it is, you wanted or public opinion, now if you do not start to do this stuff, we will go out and take it. caterpillar is one company to watch. their ceo has been on top of this. he has been very defensive about the fact they are still cr
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